Iceland Votes 2016: The minor parties

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In this final look at the parties contesting this year’s Icelandic election, we examine the minor parties, which are unlikely to get enough support to enter the Althing…

DAWN

Formed in March 2012, Dawn was created from a merger of three different parties – The Movement, Citizens’ Movement and the Liberal Party. The party describes itself as populist in nature and believes in fairness and democracy.

In this year’s manifesto, they pledge to create an active government-based community bank, hold binding referenda when 10% of the electorate call for one, and ensure natural resources are used sustainably.

In the 2013 election, Dawn won 3.1% of the vote, just shy of the 5% required to enter the Althing.

HUMANIST PARTY

This is the oldest of the minor parties, having been formed in 1984. Part of the broader international humanist movement, they believe in collectivism, are opposed to capitalism and promotes the values of Humanism. However, since receiving 1.6% in the first election it contested in 1987, the party’s vote share has collapsed massively. In 2013, the Humanist Party only managed to achieve a feeble 0.07% of the vote. Unlike Dawn and the major parties, the party is only contesting one constituency in the election – Reykjavik South.

However, since receiving 1.6% in the first election it contested in 1987, the party’s vote share has collapsed massively. In 2013, the Humanist Party only managed to achieve a feeble 0.07% of the vote. Unlike Dawn and the major parties, the party is only contesting one constituency in the election – Reykjavik South.

Unlike Dawn and the major parties, the party is only contesting one constituency in the election – Reykjavik South.

PEOPLE’S FRONT OF ICELAND

The People’s Front, Iceland’s only far-left party, was founded just months before the last parliamentary election. Committed to pacifism,

Committed to pacifism, eurosceptism and anti-capitalism, the party is ‘unconditionally opposed’ to Iceland’s membership of NATO and accession to the European Union. The party’s ‘four-year plan’ pledges to provide housing for all citizens, rebuild the healthcare system after decades of liberalism and bringing Iceland’s national broadcaster under complete public ownership. The party also opposes sanctions against Russia, would ensure that the Arctic is not exploited for commercial gain and would support efforts by the Faroe Islands and Greenland to develop an independent economy and society, with a view to breaking away from Denmark.

The party’s ‘four-year plan’ pledges to provide housing for all citizens, rebuild the healthcare system after decades of liberalism and bringing Iceland’s national broadcaster under complete public ownership. The party also opposes sanctions against Russia, would ensure that the Arctic is not exploited for commercial gain and would support efforts by the Faroe Islands and Greenland to develop an independent economy and society, with a view to breaking away from Denmark.

The party also opposes sanctions against Russia, would ensure that the Arctic is not exploited for commercial gain and would support efforts by the Faroe Islands and Greenland to develop an independent economy and society, with a view to breaking away from Denmark.

At the last election, the party only achieved 0.06% of the vote. This year it is contesting every Icelandic constituency, except for the Northwest.

ICELANDIC NATIONAL FRONT

Iceland’s only far-right party has caused significant controversy since its formation in January this year, particularly over their anti-Islam and anti-immigration rhetoric.

The party rejects any moves for Iceland to join the EU and says that the country should withdraw from the EEA and the Schengen Area without delay.

As well as this, the National Front opposes Sharia law and would ban the burka, as well as activities in mosques and Koran schools.

It also supports means testing personal tax contributions, to ensure the elderly, disabled and students are excluded, commits to keeping public ownership of energy and would implement stringent controls on immigration.

Due to the party’s toxic reputation, the Progressive Party and Bright Future have both ruled out entering into coalition agreements with the party, should it get enough support to enter the Althing.

2016 is the National Front’s first election and it is contesting only the South and Northwest constituencies.

This marks the end of the profiles of the Icelandic political parties – we will return to the Icelandic election on Friday to examine the most recent election polls, how the election system works, and what the possible result might mean for coalition building…

3 responses to “Iceland Votes 2016: The minor parties

  1. Pingback: Iceland Votes 2016: Election Day guide | ThoughtsFromDan·

  2. Pingback: Iceland Votes 2016: Results so far | ThoughtsFromDan·

  3. Pingback: Iceland Votes 2016 – Final result | ThoughtsFromDan·

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